Dental FAQs > Dental FAQs Category (18 entries)

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  • It is very important to maintain the health of the primary teeth. Neglected cavities can and frequently do cause pain and/or infection. When left untreated, these cavities can negatively affect ...
  • Radiographs (X-Rays) are a necessary part of your child’s dental diagnostic process. Without them, certain dental conditions can and will be missed. X-Ray’s detect much more than cavities. For ...
  • Begin daily brushing as soon as the child’s first tooth erupts. A tiny pea-size amount of fluoride toothpaste can be used after the child is old enough not to swallow it. ...
  • Healthy eating habits lead to healthy teeth. Like the rest of the body, the teeth, bones and the soft tissues of the mouth need a well-balanced diet. Children should eat a ...
  • Good oral hygiene removes bacteria and the left over food particles that combine to create cavities. For infants, use a wet gauze or clean washcloth to wipe the plaque from teeth ...
  • A sealant is a clear or shaded plastic material that is applied to the chewing surfaces (grooves) of the back teeth (premolars and molars), where four out of five cavities in ...
  • One serious form of decay among young children is baby bottle tooth decay. This condition is caused by frequent and long exposures of an infant’s teeth to liquids that contain sugar. ...
  • Teething, the process of baby (primary) teeth coming through the gums into the mouth, is variable among individual babies. Some babies get their teeth early and some get them late. In ...
  • Children’s teeth begin forming before birth. As early as 4 months, the first primary (or baby) teeth to erupt through the gums are the lower central incisors, followed closely by the ...
  • Toothache: Clean the area of the affected tooth thoroughly. Rinse the mouth vigorously with warm water or use dental floss to dislodge impacted food or debris. DO NOT place aspirin on ...
  • Fluorides are a natural occurring trace element in most sources of water. Too little fluoride in your child's water will lead to a lifetime of unnecessary decay. Too much ...
  • Tooth brushing is one of the most important tasks for good oral health. Many toothpastes, and/or tooth polishes, however, can damage young smiles. They contain harsh abrasives which can wear away ...
  • Parents are often concerned about the nocturnal grinding of teeth (bruxism). Often, the first indication is the noise created by the child grinding on their teeth during sleep. Or, the parent ...
  • Thumb sucking is a natural reflex and a normal activity. Fingers, thumbs, or pacifiers may be preferred by some infants. When the habit is intense or vigorous and persists ...
  • You might not be surprised anymore to see people with pierced tongues, lips or cheeks. You may, however, be surprised to know just how dangerous these piercings can be.  ...
  • Tobacco in any form can jeopardize your child’s health and cause incurable damage. Teach your child about the dangers of tobacco. Smokeless tobacco, also called spit, chew or ...
  • Developing malocclusions, or bad bites, can be recognized as early as 2-3 years of age. Often, early steps can be taken to reduce the need for major orthodontic treatment at a ...
  • When a child begins to participate in recreational activities and organized sports, injuries can occur. A properly fitted mouth guard is an important piece of athletic gear that can help protect ...